Posts Tagged ‘Afro Beat’

Rita Indiana Y Los Misterios

September 16, 2009

Rita Indiana y Los Misterios are a breath of fresh air in this current pollution of Indie music. Don’t get me wrong, I like a lot of the Indie music that’s being produced in Latin-America. My only beef is that a lot of those Indie acts make music with a gaze to The United States and Europe. There’s nothing wrong with that per say, but with such rich music traditions in Latin-America you’d think we’d get more Indie music with Latin-American roots. Instead we get a bunch of young artists that are looking more out than in to inspire their own music and fashion.

Rita Indiana y Los Misterios

Rita Indiana y Los Misterios

But Rita Indiana y Los Misterios ain’t going that route. These Dominican cats have found a perfect balance. Sure they have Indie’s lasers and synths, but they apply them to one of their island’s most beloved musical genres—merengue. Sounds a little strange, but it works. While the music is playful, Rita’s heavy vocal’s demand seriousness. Those same vocals make for a nice laid back Afro-Beat/Latin-American folk track that we’re giving you today, titled, “Jardinera.” Yes, Rita and her band can slow it down too.

Rita Indiana y Los Misterios – Jardinera (MP3)

Rita Indiana y Los Misterios – Jardinera (Youtube)

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Rich Medina and Bobbito Garcia Present: The Connection Vol. 1: Modern Explorations in Afro-Beat and Afro-Latin

July 28, 2009

Rich Medina and Bobbito Garcia are successful DJs because they’re brave DJs. In a career where you’re constantly faced with having to please a crowd, both Rich and Bobbito dare to step out of the mainstream to introduce only the freshest music to their listeners. They have so much confidence in the music they love, that they aren’t afraid to challenge the expectations of club crowds.

Rich Medina and Bobbito Present: The Connection Vol.1

Rich Medina and Bobbito Present: The Connection Vol.1

Both have a good ear for everything from Afro-Beat to Hip-Hop to Latin Jazz to Soul. And now, through The Connection Vol. 1: Modern Explorations in Afro-Beat and Afro-Latin, we get to see how they come together to compile the best from Afro-Beat and Afro-Latin. One mighty fine tune they’ve included in this compilation is Soul Jazz Orchestra’s “Mugambi.” Learn from Rich and Bobbito and play it for your own party people at your next party. (Also, you’ll find a nicely scratched and cut Salsa track by Rob Swift in the compilation. For real. No lie.)

Soul Jazz Orchestra-Mugambi (MP3)

The Funky Beats of Revolutionary Cuba

July 28, 2009

Si Para Usted Vol.2

Si Para Usted Vol.2

Waxing Deep has just put out Volume 2 of Si Para Usted: The Funky Beats of Revolutionary Cuba. The folks at Waxing Deep really dug in the crates this time around to bring us some even more rare groovy tunes from Cuba’s 60’s and 70’s. Chances are you probably haven’t heard of any of these musicians before, but you’ll surely recognize the funk that’s in every song. It’s crazy how powerful music is—despite the blockade, you can hear how Cuban music was being influenced by some Rock and Soul. As a result, we get some of the most electrifying funky Cuban music I’ve ever heard. In “Vehicle” you’ll hear some of what I’m talking about—we get explosive trumpets, an organ, and a smooth Afro-Cuban feel on the drums.

Vehicle-Orquesta Cubana De Música Moderna (MP3)

Song of the Day: Antibalas’ “Che Che Cole”

June 18, 2009

 

Antibalas

Antibalas

I was happy to see Antibalas‘ horn section collaborating with The Roots and guest performers, Paul Simon and Public Enemy, on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. I was a bit shocked—in a good way. I mean, these guys are a talented bunch in a country that unfortunately chooses to put bad music on its mainstream waves. So as you can imagine, I was glad to see them get some air time. That’s why they’re our group for our Song of the Day. When I saw them on Late Night, I remembered the cover they did of Willie Colon and Hector Lavoe’s “Che Che Cole.” Willie Colon and Hector Lavoe’s purpose was to pay honor to Africa for the immense influence it has had on Latin American music and culture. In a sense, they were telling Latin-Americans to acknowledge our African roots. And there’s no doubt about that—it’s in our music, in our language, in our food, and in our blood. Lavoe sang it, “…todos somos hermanos/ lo bailan en Venezuela/ lo bailan en Panama/ este ritmo es Africano/ y donde quiera va acabar.” And Antibalas brought it closer to home, to U.S. Latinos, by adding their own spin to those lyrics with, “lo bailan en Puerto Rico/ lo bailan en Nueva York/ este ritmo es Africano y Antibalas te lo dio.” We’re giving you both Salsa and Afro-beat versions—’cause we love ’em both. 

Willie Colon & Hector Lavoe-Che Che Cole (MP3)

Antibalas-Che Che Cole (MP3)

Willie Colon & Hector Lavoe—Che Che Cole (Video)

Antibalas—Che Che Cole (Youtube Audio)